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Michigan Science Standards

Content Standard 2: 
All students will use classification systems to describe groups of living things; compare and contrast differences in the life cycles of living things; investigate and explain how living things obtain and use energy; and analyze how parts of living things are adapted to carry out specific functions. (Organization of Living Things)

   Elementary

1. Compare and classify familiar organisms on the basis of observable physical characteristics. ( Key concepts: Plant and animal parts-backbone, skin, shell, limbs, roots, leaves, stems, flowers. Real-world contexts: Animals that look similar-snakes, worms, millipedes; flowering and nonflowering plants; pine tree, oak tree, rose, algae.) 

NatureWorks Episodes

13. Species Diversity
14. Niche

2. Describe vertebrates in terms of observable body parts and characteristics. ( Key concepts: Vertebrate characteristics-fur, scales, feathers, horns, claws, eyes, quills, beaks, teeth, skeleton, muscles, cells. Real-world contexts: Vertebrate and nonvertebrate animals, such as humans, cow, sparrow, goldfish, spider, starfish, and animals listed above.) 

3. Describe life cycles of familiar organisms.
( Key concepts: Life cycle stages-egg, young, adult, seed, flower, fruit. Real-world contexts: Common plants and animals such as beans, apples, butterflies, grasshoppers frogs, birds.) 

4. Compare and contrast food, energy, and environmental needs of selected organisms.
( Key concepts: Life requirements-food, air, water, minerals, sunlight, space, habitat. Real-world contexts: Germinating seeds, such as beans, corn; aquarium or terrarium life, such as guppy, goldfish, snail.) 

NatureWorks Episodes

9. The Wildlife Web I 
10. The Wildlife  Web II
11. Decomposers/Scavengers
12. Population Dynamics
14. Niche

5. Describe functions of selected seed plant parts. ( Key concepts: Plant parts-roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits, seeds. Real-world contexts: Common edible plant parts, such as bean, cauliflower, carrot, apple, tomato, spinach.) 

NatureWorks Episodes

9. The Wildlife Web I 
   Middle School

1. Compare and classify organisms into major groups on the basis of their structure. ( Key concepts: Characteristics used for classification- vertebrates/invertebrates, cold-blooded/warm-blooded, single-cell/multicellular, flowering/nonflowering. Real-world contexts: Representative organisms, such as dog, worm, snake, Amoeba, geranium, wheat.) 

NatureWorks Episodes

14. Species Diversity

2. Describe the life cycle of a flowering plant. ( Key concepts: Flowering plant parts and processes-roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits, seeds, embryo, pollen, ovary, egg cell, germination, fertilization. Real-world contexts: Common flowering plants, such as bean, tulip.) 

3. Describe evidence that plants make and store food. ( Key concepts: Process and products of food production-photo-synthesis, starch, sugar, oxygen. Real-world contexts: Plant food storage organs, such as potato, onion; starch storage in plants grown under different conditions.) 

NatureWorks Episodes

9. The Wildlife Web I 

4. Explain how selected systems and processes work together in plants and animals. ( Key concepts: Systems/Processes-digestion, circulation, respiration, endocrine, reproduction, skeletal, muscular, nervous, excretion, transport, growth, repair. Real-world contexts: Interrelations of body systems during selected activities, such as among skeletal, muscular, circulatory, and respiratory systems during physical exercise.) 

Content Standard 4: 

All students will explain how scientists construct and scientifically test theories concerning the origin of life and evolution of species; compare ways that living organisms are adapted (suited) to survive and reproduce in their environments; and analyze how species change through time. (Evolution) 

   Elementary

1. Explain how fossils provide evidence about the nature of ancient life. ( Key concepts: Types of evidence-fossil, extinct, ancient, modern life forms. Real-world contexts: Common contexts-plant and animal fossils, museum dioramas and paintings/drawings of ancient life and/or habitats.) 

2. Explain how physical and/or behavioral characteristics of organisms help them to survive in their environments. ( Key concepts: Characteristics-adaptation, fitness, instinct, learning, habit . Traits and their adaptive values-sharp teeth or claws for catching and killing prey, color for camouflage. Real-world contexts: Common vertebrate adaptations, such as white polar bears, sharp claws and sharp canines for predators, changing colors of chameleon; behaviors, such as migration, communication of danger, adaptation to changes in the environment.) 

NatureWorks Episodes

1. Adaptation
2. Coloration
3. Natural Communication
4. Migration
 
 
   
Content Standard 5:
All students will explain how parts of an ecosystem are related and how they interact; explain how energy is distributed to living things in an ecosystem; investigate and explain how communities of living things change over a period of time; describe how materials cycle through an ecosystem and get reused in the environment; and analyze how humans and the environment interact. (Ecosystems) 
   Elementary

1. Identify familiar organisms as part of a food chain or food web and describe their feeding relationships within the web. ( Key concepts: Producer, consumer, predator, prey, decomposer, habitat. Real-world contexts: Food chains and food webs involving organisms, such as rabbits, birds, snakes, grasshoppers, plants.) 

NatureWorks Episodes

9. The Wildlife Web I 
10. The Wildlife  Web II
11. Decomposers/Scavengers

2. Explain common patterns of interdependence and interrelationships of living things. ( Key concepts: Producer, consumer, predator, prey, decomposer, habitat. Real-world contexts: Relationships among plants and animals in an ecosystem-symbiotic relationships, such as insects and flowering plants, birds eating fruit and spreading seeds; parasitic relationships, such as human and mosquitoes, trees and mistletoe.) 

NatureWorks Episodes

5. Habitat
6. Marine Communities
7. Fresh Water Communities
8. Terrestrial Communities
9. The Wildlife Web I 
10. The Wildlife  Web II
11. Decomposers/Scavengers
12. Population Dynamics
13. Species Diversity
14. Niche

3. Describe the basic requirements for all living things to maintain their existence. ( Key concepts: Needs of life-food, habitat, water, shelter, air, light, minerals. Real-world contexts: Selected ecosystems, such as an aquarium, rotting log, terrarium, backyard, local pond or wetland, wood lot.) 

NatureWorks Episodes

5. Habitat
6. Marine Communities
7. Fresh Water Communities
8. Terrestrial Communities
9. The Wildlife Web I 
10. The Wildlife  Web II
11. Decomposers/Scavengers
12. Population Dynamics
16. Life at Risk

4. Design systems that encourage growing of particular plants or animals. ( Key concepts: Needs of life-food, habitat, water, shelter, air, light, minerals. Real-world contexts: Ecosystems managed by humans, including farms, ranches, gardens, lawns, potted plants.) 

5. Describe positive and negative effects of humans on the environment. ( Key concepts: Human effects on the environment-garbage, habitat destruction, land management, resource management. Real-world contexts: Household wastes, school wastes, waste water treatment, habitat destruction due to community growth, reforestation projects, establishing parks or other green spaces.) 

NatureWorks Episodes

4. Migration
5. Habitat
6. Marine Communities
7. Fresh Water Communities
8. Terrestrial Communities
16. Life at Risk
   Middle School

1. Describe common patterns of relationships among populations. ( Key concepts: Participants and relationships-predator, prey, parasitism, competition, symbiosis. Real-world contexts: Examples of predator-prey, symbiotic, and parasitic relationships-see elementary benchmarks 1 and 2; examples of competitive relationships, including squirrels and seed-eating birds, cattle and bison.)

NatureWorks Episodes

6. Marine Communities
7. Fresh Water Communities
8. Terrestrial Communities
9. The Wildlife Web I 
10. The Wildlife  Web II
11. Decomposers/Scavengers
12. Population Dynamics
14. Niche

2. Predict the effects of changes in one population in a food web on other populations. ( Key concepts: Natural balance, population, dependence, survival. Real-world contexts: Plants and animals in an ecosystem dependent upon each other for survival in selected ecosystems-see elementary benchmark 3; comparison of animals and plants found in polluted vs. nonpolluted water, urban vs. rural settings, rural vs. forest settings.) 

NatureWorks Episodes

5. Habitat
6. Marine Communities
7. Fresh Water Communities
8. Terrestrial Communities
9. The Wildlife Web I 
10. The Wildlife  Web II
11. Decomposers/Scavengers
12. Population Dynamics
14. Niche
15. Invasive Species
16. Life at Risk

3. Describe how all organisms in an ecosystem acquire energy directly or indirectly from sunlight.
( Key concepts: Sunlight, plants, food, photosynthesis, heat. Real-world contexts: Selected food chains, including humans; also see Cells benchmarks related to photosynthesis.) 

NatureWorks Episodes

9. The Wildlife Web I 
10. The Wildlife  Web II
11. Decomposers/Scavengers

4. Describe the likely succession of a given ecosystem over time. ( Key concepts: Succession, stages, climax community. Real-world contexts: Process of gradual change in ecological systems, such as in ponds or abandoned farm fields.) 

5. Identify some common materials that cycle through the environment. ( Key concepts: Carbon cycle and water cycle-water, carbon dioxide, oxygen, sugar (food). Also see appropriate Cells and Atmosphere and Weather benchmarks. Real-world contexts: Selected ecosystems-also see elementary benchmark 3.) 

NatureWorks Episodes

6. Marine Communities
7. Fresh Water Communities
8. Terrestrial Communities
9. The Wildlife Web I 
10. The Wildlife  Web II
11. Decomposers/Scavengers

6. Describe ways in which humans alter the environment. ( Key concepts: Agriculture, land use, resource development, resource use, solid waste, toxic waste. Real-world contexts: Human activities, such as farming, pollution from manufacturing and other sources, hunting, habitat destruction, land development.) 

7. Explain how humans use and benefit from plant and animal materials. ( Key concepts: Materials from plants, including-wood, paper, cotton, linen, starch, rubber, wax, and oils. Materials from animals, including leather, wool, fur, protein, oils, wax. Real-world contexts: Human-made objects that incorporate plant and animal materials, including clothing, building materials, machines, and medicines-also see elementary benchmark 1, and middle shool benchmarks 3 and 6-also see appropriate Geosphere benchmarks.) 



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