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Rhinodermatidae - Darwin's Frogs

 

Classification

 Kingdom: Animalia
 Phylum: Chordata
 Subphylum: Vertebrata
 Class: Amphibia
 Order: Anura 
 Family: Rhinodermatidae

Darwin's FrogThere are only three species in this family. They are small green frogs found the the forests of Argentina and Chile. The have triangular heads with a fleshy tip on the end of their snout that looks like a horn!

Darwin's frogs have an unusual behavior not seen in any other species of frog. After the female lays her eggs, the male guards them for two weeks. He then puts them in his mouth and carries them around in his vocal pouch! When the froglets are old enough to care for themselves, they hop out of the male's mouth!

Darwin's frogs were first recorded by Charles Darwin. Charles Darwin is famous for developing the theory of evolution.

 

World Status Key
Least ConcernLeast Concern Near ThreatenedNear Threatened VulnerableVulnerable EndangeredEndangered Critically EndangeredCritically Endangered extinct in the wildExtinct in Wild extinctExtinct
Status and range is taken from ICUN Redlist. If no status is listed, there is not enough data to establish status.

US Status Key
Threatened in US Threatened in US Threatened in New Hampshire Threatened in NH Endangered in US Endangered in US Endangered in NH Endangered in NH Introduced Introduced
Status taken from US Fish and Wildlife and NH Fish and Game

  New Hampshire Species

 

  North/Central American Species

None   None

Other Species Around the World

AfricaAfrica AsiaAsia AustraliaAustralia EuropeEurope North AmericaNorth America South AmericaSouth America New Hampshire SpeciesNH More InfoClick for More Info pictureClick for Image

Barrio's Frog - Insuetophrynus acarpicusCritically Endangered South America image More Info
Darwin's Frog - Rhinoderma darwinii Vulnerable South America image
More Info
  Chile Darwin's Frog - Rhinoderma rufum † Critically Endangered South America More Info
 

Additional Information

Key: profile Profile Photos Photos Video Video Audio Audio

Barrio's Frog - Insuetophrynus acarpicusCritically Endangered South America
Barrio's frog is found in Chile.
Source: EDGE Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: No

Darwin's Frog - Rhinoderma darwinii profile Photos Audio Vulnerable South America
Darwin's frog is found in Argentina and Chile.
Source: AmphibiaWeb Intended Audience: General Reading Level: High School Teacher Section: No

Darwin's Frog - Rhinoderma darwinii profile Photos Vulnerable South America
Darwin's frog has a triangular head with a sharply pointed snout.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Midlde School Teacher Section: Yes

Darwin's Frog - Rhinoderma darwinii profile Photos Video Vulnerable South America
Male Darwin's frogs brood their young tadpoles in their enlarged vocal sacs.
Source: BBC Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Midlde School Teacher Section: No

Darwin's Frog - Rhinoderma darwinii Video Vulnerable South America
When the tadpoles become frogs, they emerge from their father's mouth.
Source: National Geographic Intended Audience: General Reading Level: NA Teacher Section: No

Chile Darwin's Frog - Rhinoderma rufum † profile Audio Critically Endangered South America
Darwin's frog is found in Chile.
Source: AmphibiaWeb Intended Audience: General Reading Level: High School Teacher Section: No

Chile Darwin's Frog - Rhinoderma rufum profile Photos Critically Endangered South America
The Chile Darwin's frog has not been seen since 1980.
Source: EDGE Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: No

Chile Darwin's Frog - Rhinoderma rufum profile Photos Critically Endangered South America
Habitat destruction and disease may be responsible for the decline and possible extinction of the Chile Darwin's frog.
Source: Arkive Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: Yes