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Macropodidae - kangaroos, wallabies

Red-necked pademelonThere are 67 species of marsupials in this family. They are found in Australia and New Guinea. The have long rear feet and small front legs. They can stand upright by resting on their rear feet. They are powerful hoppers, and they have long, thick tails that they use to help them keep their balance. They have long, triangular heads and large ears. They are herbivores and most species are nocturnal.

Species in this family include the lowland tree kangaroo, the white-throated tree kangaroo, the black dorcopsis, the yellow-footed rock wallaby, the lesser forest wallaby, the rufous hare-wallaby, the red kangaroo, the eastern gray kangaroo, the black wallaroo, the red-necked pademelon, the quokka, and the whiptail wallaby.

Red KangarooThe red kangaroo is the largest marsupial. It is found in central Australia. It stands about 5 feet tall and has a tail that is over 40 inches long. The male red kangaroo is usually reddish-brown and the female usually a bluish-gray.

The red kangaroo can't walk, it hops when it needs to move! It can leap up to six feet in the air and can hop as far as 25 feet! It can hop at speeds of up to 35 miles per hour for short distances. The red kangaroo lives in groups or pods. It is nomadic and moves from place to place in search of food.

 

World Status Key
Least ConcernLeast Concern Near ThreatenedNear Threatened VulnerableVulnerable EndangeredEndangered Critically EndangeredCritically Endangered extinct in the wildExtinct in Wild extinctExtinct
Status and range is taken from ICUN Redlist. If no status is listed, there is not enough data to establish status.

US Status Key
Threatened in US Threatened in US Threatened in New Hampshire Threatened in NH Endangered in US Endangered in US Endangered in NH Endangered in NH Introduced Introduced
Status taken from US Fish and Wildlife and NH Fish and Game

  New Hampshire Species

 

 North/Central American Species

None   None

Other Species Around the World

Africa Africa Asia Asia Australia Australia/Oceania Europe Europe North America North/Central America South America South America New Hampshire Species NH Species

Bennett's Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus bennettianus Near Threatened Australia
Doria's Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus dorianus Vulnerable Australia
Goodfellow's Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus goodfellowi Endangered Australia Asia
Grizzled Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus inustus Vulnerable Australia Asia
Lumholtz's Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus lumholtzi Least Concern Australia
Huon Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus matschiei Endangered Australia
Wondiwoi Tree-kangaroo - Dendrolagus mayri Critically Endangered Asia
Dingiso - Dendrolagus mbaiso Endangered Asia
Ifola Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus notatus Endangered Australia
Golden-mantled Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus pulcherrimus Critically Endangered Australia
Tenkile - Dendrolagus scottae Critically Endangered Australia
Lowlands Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus spadix Least Concern Australia
Seri's Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus stellarum Vulnerable Australia Asia
Black Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus ursinus Vulnerable Asia
Black Dorcopsis - Dorcopsis atrata Critically Endangered Australia
White-striped Dorcopsis - Dorcopsis hageni Least Concern Australia Asia
Gray Dorcopsis - Dorcopsis luctuosa Vulnerable Australia Asia
Brown Dorcopsis - Dorcopsis muelleri Least Concern Asia
Papuan Forest Wallaby - Dorcopsulus macleayi Least Concern Australia
Small Dorcopsis - Dorcopsulus vanheurni Near Threatened Australia Asia
Central Hare Wallaby - Lagorchestes asomatus extinct Australia
Spectacled Hare Wallaby - Lagorchestes conspicillatus Least Concern Australia
Rufous Hare Wallaby - Lagorchestes hirsutus Vulnerable Australia
Eastern Hare Wallaby - Lagorchestes leporides extinct Australia
Banded Hare Wallaby - Lagostrophus fasciatus Endangered Australia
Agile Wallaby - Macropus agilis Least Concern Australia Asia
Antilopine Wallaroo - Macropus antilopinus Least Concern Australia
Black Wallaroo - Macropus bernardus Vulnerable Australia
Black-striped Wallaby - Macropus dorsalis Least Concern Australia
Tammar Wallaby - Macropus eugenii Least Concern Australia
Western Gray Kangaroo - Macropus fuliginosus Vulnerable Australia
Eastern Grey Kangaroo - Macropus giganteus Least Concern Australia
Toolache Wallaby - Macropus greyi extinct Australia
Western Brush Wallaby - Macropus irma Least Concern Australia
  Parma Wallaby - Macropus parma Near Threatened Australia
Whiptail Wallaby - Macropus parryi Least Concern Australia
Hill Wallaroo - Macropus robustus Least Concern Australia
Red-necked Wallaby - Macropus rufogriseus Least Concern Australia
Red Kangaroo - Macropus rufus Least Concern Australia
Bridled Nailtail Wallaby - Onychogalea fraenata Endangered Australia
Crescent Nailtail Wallaby - Onychogalea lunata extinct Australia
Northern Nailtail Wallaby - Onychogalea unguifera Least Concern Australia
Allied Rock Wallaby - Petrogale assimilis Least Concern Australia
Short-eared Rock Wallaby - Petrogale brachyotis Least Concern Australia
Monjon - Petrogale burbidgei Near Threatened Australia
Cape York Rock Wallaby - Petrogale coenensis Near Threatened Australia
Pygmy Rock Wallaby - Petrogale concinna Australia
Godman's Rock Wallaby - Petrogale godmani Least Concern Australia
Herbert's Rock Wallaby - Petrogale herberti Least Concern Australia
Unadorned Rock Wallaby - Petrogale inornata Least Concern Australia
Black-footed Rock Wallaby - Petrogale lateralis Near Threatened Australia
Mareeba Rock Wallaby - Petrogale mareeba Least Concern Australia
Brush-tailed Rock Wallaby - Petrogale penicillata Near Threatened Australia
Proserpine Rock Wallaby - Petrogale persephone Endangered Australia
Purple-necked Rock Wallaby - Petrogale purpureicollis Least Concern Australia
Rothschild's Rock Wallaby - Petrogale rothschildi Least Concern Australia
Sharman's Rock Wallaby - Petrogale sharmani Near Threatened Australia
Yellow-footed Rock Wallaby - Petrogale xanthopus Near Threatened Australia
Quokka - Setonix brachyurus Vulnerable Australia
Tasmanian Pademelon - Thylogale billardierii Least Concern Australia
New Guinea Pademelon - Thylogale browni Vulnerable Australia Asia
Dusky Pademelon - Thylogale brunii Vulnerable Australia Asia
Calaby's Pademelon - Thylogale calabyi Endangered Australia
Mountain Pademelon - Thylogale lanatus Endangered Australia
Red-legged Pademelon - Thylogale stigmatica Least Concern Australia Asia
Red-necked Pademelon - Thylogale thetis Least Concern Australia
Swamp Wallaby - Wallabia bicolor Least Concern Australia

Additional Information

Key: profile Profile Photos Photos Video Video Audio Audio

Kangaroo and Wallaby profile Photos
Did you know that Macropodidae means big feet? The animals in this family certainly earned that name! Learn more about wallabies, kangaroos and other members of the Macropodidae family!
Source: San Diego Zoo Intended Audience: Students Reading Level: Elementary/Middle School Teacher Section: No

Kangaroo profile
Learn more about kangaroos and print out a diagram of their anatomy.
Source: Enchanted Learning Intended Audience: Students Reading Level: Elementary School Teacher Section: No

Family Macropodidae profile Photos
There are 54 species in this family of marsupials! Learn more about them.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: No

Agile Wallaby - Macropus agilis profile Photos Least Concern Australia Asia
The agile wallaby is yellowish-brown and has a white cheek stripe. Learn more.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Allied Rock Wallaby - Petrogale assimilis profile Photos Least Concern Australia
The Allied rock wallaby is found in rocky terrain in northern Queensland, Australia.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Antilopine Wallaroo - Macropus antilopinus profile Photos Least Concern Australia
Antilopine wallaroos live in the savanna woodlands of Australia.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Banded Hare-wallaby - Lagostrophus fasciatus profile Photos Endangered Australia
This wallaby is only found Dorre Island and Bernier Island in Shark Bay.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Banded Hare-wallaby
- Lagostrophus fasciatus profile Photos Endangered Australia
The banded hare-wallaby gets its name from the dark stripes on its back.
Source: Arkive Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: No

Black Dorcopsis - Dorcopsis atrata profile Critically Endangered Australia
The black dorcopis, unlike other wallaby species, is not adapted for jumping.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Black-footed Rock Wallaby - Petrogale lateralis profile Photos video Near Threatened Australia
The black-footed rock wallaby uses it strong tail to keep its balance as it jumps from rock to rock.
Source:
Arkive Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: No

Black-footed Rock Wallaby - Petrogale lateralis profile Near Threatened Australia
The black-footed rock wallaby lives on rock piles, cliffs, and rocky hills in northern South Australia, the southern parts of the Northern Territory, and Western Australia.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Black-striped Wallaby Black-striped Wallaby - Macropus dorsalis profile Photos Least Concern Australia
The black striped wallaby gets its name from the black stripe that runs down its back. Learn more.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Black Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus ursinus profile Photos Vulnerable Asia
The black tree kangaroo has black fur and white cheeks.
Source: Arkive Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: No

Black Wallaroo - Macropus bernardus profile Vulnerable Australia
The Black Wallaroo is one of the smallest species in the kangaroo family.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Bennett's Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus bennettianus profile Photos Near Threatened Australia
Bennett's tree kangaroo is found in tropical rainforests in northeastern Queensland, Australia.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: No

Bridled Nail-tailed Wallaby - Onychogalea fraenata profile Photos video Endangered Australia
The bridled nailtail wallaby gets part of its name from the white ‘bridle’ line running from the center of the neck down behind its forearms.
Source:
Arkive Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: No

Bridled Nail-tailed Wallaby - Onychogalea fraenata profile Photos Endangered Australia
The bridled nail-tailed wallaby once lived in the semi-arid region of eastern Australia. It is now only found in the Taunton Scientific Reserve in northeastern Australia.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Bridled Nail-tailed Wallaby - Onychogalea fraenata profile Photos Endangered Australia
The bridled nail-tailed wallaby has a horny spur on the end of its tail. Learn more!
Source: Earth's Endangered Creatures Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: No

Brush-tailed Rock Wallaby - Petrogale penicillata profile Photos Near Threatened Australia
The brush-tailed rock wallaby is native to Australia, but a small population of rock-wallabies can be found on the island of Oahu. They are the descendents of a pair brought to the island in 1916.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Brush-tailed Rock Wallaby - Petrogale penicillata profile Photos Near Threatened Australia
The brush-tailed rock wallaby gets its name from its bushy tail!
Source: Arkive Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: No

Dingiso - Dendrolagus mbaiso profile Photos Endangered Asia
The dingiso was only discovered by scientists in 1994. It has a black body and white markings on its undersides.
Source: Arkive Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: No

Doria's Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus dorianus profile Photos Vulnerable Australia
The Doria's tree kangaroo is the heaviest tree dwelling marsupial in the world.
Source: Arkive Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: No

Eastern Gray Kangaroo - Macropus giganteus profile Photos Video Least Concern Australia
A gray kangaroo can reach speeds of over 35 miles an hour and travel for long distances at 15 miles an hour. Learn more and print out a fact sheet!
Source: National Geographic Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: No

Eastern Gray Kangaroo - Macropus giganteus profile Photos Least Concern Australia
Male eastern gray kangaroos often "box" with each other to establish dominance.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Eastern Gray Kangaroo - Macropus giganteus profile Photos Least Concern Australia
The eastern gray kangaroo eats mostly grasses, but sometimes eats herbs and shrubs.They usually graze from dusk to dawn, when it is cooler. They rest during the heat of the day. Learn more.
Source: Los Angeles Zoo Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Elementary/Middle School Teacher Section: No

Eastern Gray Kangaroo - Macropus giganteus profile Photos Least Concern Australia
Male eastern gray kangaroos are about five feet tall and weigh up to 200 pounds. Learn more.
Source: Fort Wayne Children's Zoo Intended Audience: Students Reading Level: Elementary/Middle School Teacher Section: Yes

Goodfellow's Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus goodfellowi profile Photos Endangered Australia Asia
Goodfellow's Tree Kangaroo has a brown body and a yellowish belly and face. It has long claws that help it climb trees.
Source: Konica Minolta Intended Audience: Students Reading Level: Elementary School Teacher Section: Yes

Goodfellow's Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus goodfellowi profile Photos Endangered Australia Asia
Goodfellow's Tree Kangaroo is solitary and nocturnal. Learn more.
Source: Animal Planet Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: No

Goodfellow's Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus goodfellowi profile Photos Endangered Australia Asia
Goodfellow's tree kangaroo is found in dense tropical forests in Papua New Guinea.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: No

Gray Dorcopsis - Dorcopsis luctuosa profile Photos Vulnerable Australia Asia
The gray dorcopis live in lowland tropical rainforests in eastern and southeastern New Guinea.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Grizzled Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus inustus Photos Vulnerable Australia Asia
The grizzled tree kangaroo has gray fur, a long face and large, rounded ears.
Source: Arkive Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: No

Grizzled Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus inustus profile Vulnerable Australia Asia
Grizzled tree kangaroos travel from tree to tree by leaping.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Hill Wallaroo - Macropus robustus profile Photos video Least Concern Australia
The hill wallaroo is also known as the eastern wallaroo or common wallaroo. Learn more!
Source: Arkive Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: No

Hill Wallaroo - Macropus robustus profile Photos Least Concern Australia
The hill wallaroo get its name from where it lives! It can be found in mountainous pastures of eastern Australia and prefers areas with rocky outcrops or stony ground.
Source: Oakland Zoo Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: Yes

Huon Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus matschiei profile Photos Video Endangered Australia
The Huon tree kangaroo has a reddish brown body. Its tail, belly, and ears are yellow. See for yourself!
Source: Arkive Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: No

Huon Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus matschiei profile Photos Endangered Australia
The Huon tree kangaroos is found only in the Huon Peninsula of Papau New Guinea and the nearby island of Umboi.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: No

Huon Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus matschiei profile Photos Endangered Australia
The Huon tree kangaroo is also known as the Matschie's Tree Kangaroo. It spends most of its time in trees!
Source: Woodland Park Zoo Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: No

Huon Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus matschiei profile Photos Endangered Australia
The Huon tree kangaroo has heavy curved claws on its feet that help it climb.
Source: Oregon Zoo Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: No

Huon Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus matschiei profile Photos Endangered Australia
Like its cousin the kangaroo, the Huon tree kangaroo can jump, but it does most of its jumping in the trees! Learn more!
Source: St. Louis Zoo Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Elementary/Middle School Teacher Section: Yes

Huon Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus matschiei profile Photos Endangered Australia
To keep cool, the tree kangaroo licks its forearms! Learn more.
Source: Lincoln Children's Zoo Intended Audience: Students Reading Level: Elementary/Middle School Teacher Section: No

Papuan Forest Wallaby - Dorcopsulus macleayi profile Photos Least Concern Australia
The Papuan forest wallaby is found in the rainforests of southern New Guinea. It is grayish-brown and has a white tip on its tail.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Parma Wallaby - Macropus parma profile Photos Near Threatened Australia
The parma wallaby is gray with a white throat and chest and a white stripe on its cheeks.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Parma Wallaby - Macropus parma Photos Near Threatened Australia
Check out some photos of the parma wallaby.
Source: Arkive Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Pygmy Rock Wallaby - Petrogale concinna profile Photos Australia
The pygmy rock wallaby is found only in the Northern Territory of Australia. It has reddish fur and a long tail tipped with a bushy tuft of black fur.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Quokka - Setonix brachyurus profile Photos Video Vulnerable Australia
The quokka has a stocky body and short brown coarse hair and lighter underparts. Learn more!
Source: Arkive Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: No

Quokka - Setonix brachyurus profile Photos Vulnerable Australia
This small marsupial is found in southwestern Australia.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Red Kangaroo - Macropus rufus profile Photos Audio Least Concern Australia
Red Kangaroos are reddish-brown with a white belly. They have black and white markings on their muzzles and white-tipped tails. Learn more and print out a fact sheet!
Source: Perth Zoo Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: No

Red Kangaroo - Macropus rufus profile Photos Least Concern Australia
Red kangaroos live over most of the central part of Australia. Learn more.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

PBSThe Big Red Roos - Macropus rufus profile Photos Least Concern Australia
To stay cool, the red kangaroos lick their arms; the moisture on their skin evaporates to cool their warm blood. Learn more!
Source: PBS Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: No

Red Kangaroo - Macropus rufus profile Photos Video Least Concern Australia
The female red kangaroo only has on baby at a time. As soon as it is born, it climbs into its mother's pouch and stays there for two months. Learn more and print out a fact sheet.
Source
: National Geographic Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: No

Red Kangaroo - Macropus rufus profile Photos Video Least Concern Australia
The red kangaroo is the largest marsupial in the world, but at birth it is the size of a pinto bean!
Source
: Los Angeles Zoo Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Elementary/Middle School Teacher Section: No

Red Kangaroo - Macropus rufus profile Photos Least Concern Australia
You probably know that a baby kangaroo is called a joey, but did you know that a male kangaroo is called a buck, or a boomer and a female kangaroo is called a doe, or a flyer? Learn more!
Source: WWF Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Elementary/Middle School Teacher Section: No

Red-legged Pademelon - Thylogale stigmatica profile Photos Least Concern Australia Asia
The red-legged pademelon is found in Australia and New Guinea.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Red-necked Wallaby - Macropus rufogriseus profile Photos Least Concern Australia
The red-necked wallaby lives in the coastal forests of eastern and southeastern Australia. Learn more.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Red-necked Pademelon - Thylogale thetis profile Photos Least Concern Australia
The Red-necked pademelon is found in eastern Australia.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Rufous Hare-wallaby - Lagorchestes hirsutus profile Photos Video Vulnerable Australia
The rufous hare-wallaby gets around by hopping on its hind legs. Learn more.
Source: Arkive Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: No

Rufous Hare-wallaby - Lagorchestes hirsutus profile Photos Vulnerable Australia
Once found in the arid and semi-arid parts of western Australia and southern Northern Territory, the rufous hare-wallaby is now only found on the islands of Dorre and Bernier off the coast of Western Australia.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Short-eared Rock Wallaby - Petrogale brachyotis profile Least Concern Australia
Short-eared rock wallabies are found in rocky areas near forests, woodlands, or savannahs.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Spectacled hare-Wallaby - Lagorchestes conspicillatus Least Concern Australia Photos Video
The spectacled hare-wallaby gets its name from the reddish-brown ring of fur around its eyes.
Source: Arkive Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: No

Swamp Wallaby - Wallabia bicolor profile Photos Least Concern Australia
Swamp wallabies live in dense forests, woodlands, and swampy areas on eastern coast of Australia .
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Swamp Wallaby - Wallabia bicolor profile Photos Least Concern Australia
Swamp wallabies have long, dense brown fur. Their tail and legs are darker in color.
Source: Cougar Mountain Zoo Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: Yes

Tammar Wallaby - Macropus eugenii profile Photos Least Concern Australia
The tamar wallaby is 18 inches from it head to the base of its tail. Learn more.
Source: National Zoo Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Elementary/Middle School Teacher Section: No

Tammar Wallaby - Macropus eugenii profile Least Concern Australia
The Tammar wallaby is found in Australia and New Zealand. Learn more.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Tasmanian Pademelon - Thylogale billardierii profile Least Concern Australia
These short, stock marsupials are found in dense vegetation in forests in Tasmania.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Tenkile Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus scottae Photos Critically Endangered Australia
The Tenkile tree kangaroo has black fur, small, rounded ears, and a long tail.
Source: Arkive Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: No

Tenkile Tree Kangaroo - Dendrolagus scottae profile Critically Endangered Australia
The Tenkile tree kangaroo is only found in the rainforests on the southern side of Mount Sumoro in Papua New Guinea.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Wallabies profile Photos Video
There are many different types of wallabies. Like their larger cousins the kangaroos, they have large rear feet, long, strong tails, and pouches. Learn more and print out a fact sheet.
Source: National Geographic Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: No

Wallaby profile
Learn more about wallabies and print out a diagram of their anatomy.
Source: Enchanted Learning Intended Audience: Students Reading Level: Elementary School Teacher Section: No

Western Gray Kangaroo - Macropus fuliginosus profile Photos video Vulnerable Australia
The western gray kangaroo use is its strong tail for balance! Learn more.
Source:
Arkive Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: No

Western Gray Kangaroo - Macropus fuliginosus profile Photos Vulnerable Australia
Western gray kangaroos live in groups of up to 50 individuals called mobs. Each mob has one dominant male.
Source: Prospect Park Zoo Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Elementary/Middle School Teacher Section: Yes

Western Gray Kangaroo - Macropus fuliginosus profile Photos Vulnerable Australia
The western gray kangaroo is found in woodlands, open forests, coastal heathland, and open grassland areas.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Whiptail Wallaby - Macropus parryi profile Photos Least Concern Australia
The whiptail wallaby is grayish brown and has a very long tail!
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Yellow-footed Rock Wallaby - Petrogale xanthopus profile Photos Near Threatened Australia
The yellow-footed rock wallaby is grayish above and has a white belly. Its ears, legs, and feet are yellow to red in color.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: Yes

Yellow-footed Rock Wallaby - Petrogale xanthopus profile Photos Near Threatened Australia
The yellow-footed rock wallaby has rough pads on its feet that keep it from slipping as it hops from rock to rock.
Source: Australasian Regional Association of Zoological Parks and Aquaria Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle/High School Teacher Section: No